Any business owner can throw money at Facebook and Google advertising. Many do, in a haphazard way, hoping that “some of the mud sticks.”

But it takes some careful “Sales Thinking” and technical skill to avoid wasting that money, and a lot of time. It’s often a mistake to ask one ad to do all the ‘heavy lifting’ – in other words, asking an ad to bring instant sales straight off the bat.

Advertising a business’s services isn’t like selling something generic, like a fridge, or a microwave oven. Everybody is familiar with those products, but for personal services? Not so much.

So it’s often better for a small business to use digital advertising to ‘raise leads’ and then up-sell to those prospective customers and clients, rather than try to sell a big-ticket service to them up-front.

Wafaa Karim, owner of Sydney’s Cronulla Skin Sanctuary, needed more clients for her new tattoo removal machine.

So with my team’s help, Wafaa crafted an offer designed to raise leads.

Here’s what happened: 

1) First, we designed and built a landing page to take traffic from advertising on Facebook. The landing page looks like this…

Here’s a link to that landing page. 

2) Second, we wrote and designed a series of half a dozen ads for testing a Facebook campaign to direct prospective clients to the offer on that landing page. Wafaa’s daily advertising budget was spread evenly across all of the ads. Each ad contained the same text above the image or video. Over a 14-day period, we monitored the relative costs versus the clicks each of those ads produced.

The data eventually showed us that one particular ad was producing the best ‘click-through-rate’ at the lowest cost. So we concentrated Wafaa’s chosen daily budget into that one ad. The ad looks like this:

That ad campaign – albeit interrupted mid-term by Covid-19 lockdowns – has now been running for several months. In july 2020 alone, it produced no fewer than 58 ‘conversions’. That’s a measure of the number of people who saw the ad, clicked through to the landing page, and filled in the “Yes, Pick Me” form on the page.

That’s a conversion rate of nearly 10%, a huge figure in comparison with the worldwide average for Facebook ads.

(That figure does not include people who saw the ad and instead of filling in the form, picked up the phone and called the salon to make a booking.)

Here’s a graph of those landing page opt-ins for the month of July: 

It’s made Wafaa Karim a very happy salon owner:

Need help with your online advertising and marketing? 

Find out more here, and talk direct to  Greg Milner, about your online advertising goals. Call +61-8-94439327